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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I have a 2015 Sonata Sport and the key fob casing where you press the buttons have completely disintegrated after so many years of use. The key works fine, it's just the buttons on the case. So I have a spare one that's never been used, I found it and within 1 day, that brand new never used key fob also disintegrated exactly the same way. So I don't think this is wear and tear, this is something inherently inferior in the plastics used.

Anyway, here is a picture of the key fob.



After doing some research, everything pointed to watching some youtube videos on getting a replacement fob and transferring the inside content (chip, switch blade key) over and it's easy, or so it seems. So I ordered a generic key fob for $20. Once it arrived, I opened the new key fob and the process should be fairly simple. Until I got to open the existing fob, there is no way to open it except to destroy it because it was glued/fused together. So I did.

That's when the fun started. I transferred to content over to the new fob, but they do not fit. They kind of fit like 90% but the casing are not the same. The holding area for the chip for the new fob is a bit deeper and wider so the chip does not stay in place, the original key blade is a bit thicker so the casing will not close 100% tight unless you want to file down 1mm of the blade where it meets the casing, and so on and so on. The various youtube videos also mentioned this, that these generic fob casing requiring some degree of modification. Here are some pictures of the casings and components so you can see, they are quite different.





I took a Dremel and filed down the blade a little and then I realized not only it is a bit thicker to fit in the new fob, the pin where it is to be inserted is also offset a little. So I gave up.

The obvious answer is NOT to buy a $20 "generic" fob casing and get an OEM casing for $40 right? I ordered one and it came, and it turns out an OEM casing cannot be opened in halves like the generic ones to transfer the content, you have to destroy it to open it. Or you have to take the OEM casing to a locksmith and they will program the key fob and cut the key for another $175, or you can ask the dealer for a replacement key and I was quoted $350 minimum.

Am I missing something? Is there an easier way? Right now it seems the best approach is to get an OEM key fob and have a locksmith do it. Unless I want to keep ordering generic ones off Amazon or Ebay and hope one will fit better than the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
one additional question.

in many of the youtube videos I saw, once the key case was opened there are two chips inside the case, a larger main one and a small one in the upper corner.

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When I opened the key fob for my 2015 Sonata Sport, it does not have a smaller chip in the corner like I saw in the video. What is the function of the smaller chip? Was it added at a later year model or was it an optional feature that wasn't included?
 

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So I have a 2015 Sonata Sport and the key fob casing where you press the buttons have completely disintegrated after so many years of use. The key works fine, it's just the buttons on the case. So I have a spare one that's never been used, I found it and within 1 day, that brand new never used key fob also disintegrated exactly the same way. So I don't think this is wear and tear, this is something inherently inferior in the plastics used.


Anyway, here is a picture of the key fob.



After doing some research, everything pointed to watching some youtube videos on getting a replacement fob and transferring the inside content (chip, switch blade key) over and it's easy, or so it seems. So I ordered a generic key fob for $20. Once it arrived, I opened the new key fob and the process should be fairly simple. Until I got to open the existing fob, there is no way to open it except to destroy it because it was glued/fused together. So I did.

That's when the fun started. I transferred to content over to the new fob, but they do not fit. They kind of fit like 90% but the casing are not the same. The holding area for the chip for the new fob is a bit deeper and wider so the chip does not stay in place, the original key blade is a bit thicker so the casing will not close 100% tight unless you want to file down 1mm of the blade where it meets the casing, and so on and so on. The various youtube videos also mentioned this, that these generic fob casing requiring some degree of modification. Here are some pictures of the casings and components so you can see, they are quite different.





I took a Dremel and filed down the blade a little and then I realized not only it is a bit thicker to fit in the new fob, the pin where it is to be inserted is also offset a little. So I gave up.

The obvious answer is NOT to buy a $20 "generic" fob casing and get an OEM casing for $40 right? I ordered one and it came, and it turns out an OEM casing cannot be opened in halves like the generic ones to transfer the content, you have to destroy it to open it. Or you have to take the OEM casing to a locksmith and they will program the key fob and cut the key for another $175, or you can ask the dealer for a replacement key and I was quoted $350 minimum.

Am I missing something? Is there an easier way? Right now it seems the best approach is to get an OEM key fob and have a locksmith do it. Unless I want to keep ordering generic ones off Amazon or Ebay and hope one will fit better than the other.
Check local locksmiths, they can generally replace the butons, if not they can replace the entire key fob and. Cut the key and program it for a fraction of the cost of one from the dealer.
 
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