Sonata Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Family member has a 2003 sonata with the v6 since new. Car is very clean. Had timing belt replaced a few years ago. Anyway, here is the problem and dilemma.

Car showed signed of overheating. He quickly pulled over and shut it down. For some reason he opened the rad cap. When cooled down tried to restart with no luck. Brought to his normally trusted mechanic. Mechanic said water pump went south along with idler pully which in turn snapped the timing belt. Mechanic did not mention anything is engine is non interference or interference nor did family member ask. Mechanic goes and replaces needed parts and now claims car still does not run right and claims valves probably hit and needs more work. Without saying I'm personally unimpressed with mechanic for not mentioning or looking into valve issue first, and simple compression check on each cylinder would've told the tale.

So what's everyone's take on this? Should he just tell the mechanic to keep the car and he's not paying and get something else? Should he have the guy do a compression check or get someone competent to do the check if this guy can't? I'm thinking just get the one or two rebuilt heads and make the investment. Also, are there any other gremlin issues that come along with overheating and/or snapping the timing belt? It does not seem to have melted the head gaskets but I'd still replace the head/s if it were my car. Again, car is super clean and well taken care of maintenance wise since new.

Let's hear some opinions here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
It is normal and usual to replace the water pump and idler pulley, when the t/b is replaced, to avoid bearings going bad which "locks up" the bearing to cause the t/b to break. The trusted mechanic should have done this a few years back. This same trusted guy should also have known that the engine is "interference," and will bend the valves upon the t/b breaking. This mechanic doesn't think about what needs to be done, but maybe he is much better as an r and r mechanic.

With bent valves, the heads are going to have to be removed and reworked, maybe replaced. The valves will need to be replaced. The pistons are prolly not damaged, but that can be determined upon inspection.

This trusted mechanic should be told that he didn't do the job right the first time. If his r and r work is trusted, then see if he will heavily discount his labor to fix the problem the way it should have been done in the first place. He just may agree to do so. At some level, he has to know that he screwed up the repair job, and that you are not happy with the results. If not, then tell him you would hate to do so, but this needs to be resolved in a small claims court.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top